Interactive Blog on Static Web Host

Vision gain autonomy: freedom is the basis of moral actions. No freedom, no morality. transcend ourselves: change/improve our lives through free thoughts Goal Convert our free thoughts into free code. Free code allows users around the world to run and/or improve them. This would bring real enhancement to our tools. For example, beautiful math writing used to be a complicated process. A decade ago, this required the installation of a typesetting engine called $\LaTeX$. [Read More]

Staticman API Hosting 2018

Step-by-step guide for free-hosting on Heroku

Goal To host an instance of Staticman v3 server on Heroku. This post involves server-side setup of the commenting system. If you simply want to have a taste of this system on GitLab, you may try my demo GitLab Page, and/or configure your GitLab repo (for your static web site) with my API instance. See the previous post in this series for a tutorial. I try to address some concerns about this API service in the introduction of this series to keep this page focused on the technical aspects of my customizations against staticman/dev branch. [Read More]

Config GitLab Repo for Staticman

To keep focused on the technical setup, please refer to the introduction of this series for the reasons of choosing Staticman and GitLab. Goal To set up unauthenticated commenting system on GitLab pages. Demo GitLab Page with Staticman v3 Built on 14/09/2018 This post aims at providing a walkthrough to the GitLab repo setup. If you want to host your own Staticman API instance, you may refer to the next post in this series. [Read More]

Welcome to static comments

Staticman Powered GitLab Pages

I put some “why” questions here so as to keep focus on the technical setup of the GitLab repo and the optional Staticman API server. Why static blogs instead of dynamic ones? quicker loading time better reliability (can handle more request) no database needed greater control on content, styles and layout Why static comments? allow feedback from visitors site owner owns the comment locally (unlike WordPress, Facebook, Disqus, etc) no remote database needed, so no need to worry server errors from third-party commenting services. [Read More]